large tongue sleep apnea

tuesday, sept. 30, 2014 (healthday news) — sleep apnea is a potential health risk for millions of americans, and a new study points to a possible culprit behind the disorder: a “fat” tongue. the telltale signs include chronic loud snoring, with periodic gasps or choking — and, for many people, daytime drowsiness because of poor sleep. obese people tend to be at higher risk for sleep apnea, and schwab’s team say the new findings may help explain the link between obesity and the breathing disorder.




the tongue fat in the people with sleep apnea was concentrated at the base of the tongue. in addition to increasing the size of the tongue, higher levels of tongue fat may prevent muscles that attach the tongue to bone from positioning the tongue away from the airway during sleep, schwab’s group explained. “tongue size is one of the physical features that should be evaluated by a physician when screening obese patients to determine their risk for obstructive sleep apnea,” american academy of sleep medicine president dr. timothy morgenthaler added in the news release.

the most common cause for snoring and sleep apnea is a nasal or sinus condition that reduces the nasal airflow. when patients hear that tongue enlargement is the second most common cause of snoring and sleep apnea the first thing they ask is what in the world would make my tongue get bigger? the tongue becomes dehydrated secondary to this chronic mouth breathing.

this causes progressive worsening of the snoring and sleep apnea and is irreversible. this helps reduce the snoring and sleep apnea issue. if there is still residual snoring or sleep apnea, despite this nasal and sinus correction, it is usually secondary to the tongue enlargement. call us today to schedule a consultation to arrest this progressive tongue enlargement by diagnosing and treating the underlying nasal and sinus condition.

while obesity is the primary risk factor for developing sleep apnea, there are other causes, such as having large tonsils or a recessed jaw. the participants with sleep apnea had significantly larger tongues, tongue fat and percentage of tongue fat than those without sleep apnea, a large tongue does not guarantee someone would have sleep apnea, but it can be a reason for it. the studies are not entirely clear, but it does, large tongue sleep apnea treatment, large tongue sleep apnea treatment, how to lose tongue fat, why is my tongue fat, how to reduce tongue fat naturally.

a new study of obese adults shows that those who have obstructive sleep apnea (osa) have a significantly larger tongue with a higher amount of fat. osa is a chronic disease that involves repetitive pauses in breathing during sleep. depending on which parts of the body are affected, children with bws can have different features. these include macroglossia, or an abnormally large tongue. yes, you read that right: fatty tongues seem to worsen the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (osa), at least in cases related to obesity, the tongue becomes dehydrated secondary to this chronic mouth breathing. the tongue responds to this repeated dehydration over time by slowly, obstructive sleep apnea, how much weight loss to stop sleep apnea.

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