pfas health concerns

pfas are a group of manufactured chemicals that have been used in industry and consumer products since the 1940s because of their useful properties. perfluorooctanoic acid (pfoa) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (pfos), for example, are two of the most widely used and studied chemicals in the pfas group. one common characteristic of concern of pfas is that many break down very slowly and can build up in people, animals, and the environment over time. some pfas chemicals can accumulate in the body over time. research is also underway to better understand the health effects associated with low levels of exposure to pfas over long periods of time, especially in children.




based on current science, the benefits of breastfeeding appear to outweigh the risks for infants exposed to pfas in breast milk. to weigh the risks and benefits of breastfeeding, mothers should contact their doctors. in carrying out our mission to protect human health and the environment, epa develops regulations to prevent or to clean up hazardous chemicals released into our air, land, and water, some of which relate to pfas. it is a way for you to provide decisionmakers with key information on any or all aspects of the proposed action, including: epa’s regulations will always be announced in the federal register and can be found at the following government websites: /, and /. all comments – whether in person or written – get the same level of consideration.

pfas stands for perfluoroalkyl or polyfluoroalkyl substances. it’s a group of chemicals that have properties that allow them to repel water and oil. because of that, some scientists are concerned that these chemicals could build to levels that could harm the environment — and your body. eight major chemical companies entered into an agreement called the pfoa stewardship program to stop production of certain pfas in the u.s. but they can still come in through imported products. some studies suggest that high levels of pfas can lead to things like: pfas have water- and oil-repelling properties. in some communities, pfas may have seeped into the water supply through groundwater run-off. you might also take in pfas through your makeup. pfas are used in cosmetic products to condition and smooth out the skin and appear shiny.

a 2021 study tested 231 cosmetic products. pfas may be listed on the ingredient list as ptfe (polytetrafluoroethylene), perfluorooctyl triethoxysilane, perfluorononyl dimethicone, perfluorodecalin, and perfluorohexane. over time, the chemicals may also build up in animals and plants that come in contact with pfas. the levels will depend on the type of food and specific pfas chemicals involved. pfas can also get into your system as you come in contact with certain products made to be nonstick, stain-repellent, or water-repellent like: the fda regularly tests foods and products that people most commonly eat or use for pfas levels. if the levels are detectable, the fda does safety checks to see if it can harm human health or needs more investigation. to limit dangerous pfas exposure through contamination and overall use, the environmental protection agency (epa) plans to tackle the problem by taking the following steps: if you think you or your loved one may have been exposed to high levels of pfas, tell your doctor about it. if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant and you’ve come in contact with pfas, tell your obstetrician. epa: “basic information on pfas,” “drinking water health advisories for pfoa and pfos,” “pfas strategic roadmap: epa’s commitments to action 2021-2024.”

what are the health effects of pfas? ; heart. increased cholesterol levels. vaccine ; liver. changes in liver enzymes. infant birth weights ; infant birth weights. current scientific research suggests that exposure to high levels of certain pfas may lead to adverse health outcomes. however, research is scientific studies have shown that exposure to some pfas in the environment may be linked to harmful health effects in humans and animals., pfas symptoms, pfas symptoms, pfas cancer, where are pfas found, how to avoid pfas.

a recent review from the u.s. centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) outlines a host of health effects associated with pfas exposure, persistent chemicals, persistent health effects a growing body of science has found that there are potential adverse health impacts associated per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (pfas) are ubiquitous drinking water contaminants of concern due to mounting evidence implicating, what are pfas used for, pfas in drinking water, pfas contamination, pfas in food, cdc pfas health effects, pfas cancer types, pfas, epa, pfas teflon, how does pfas affect the environment, pfas map.

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